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BYU Football: Arizona State Preview & Prediction

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Last week was awesome, right Cougar fans? We are starting again this evening. BYU will face the Arizona State Sun Devils at 8:15 p.m. MST in what will be the first ranked game at Lavell Edwards Stadium since 2009. At the very least, this game could feature the best uniformed game of the weekend, but the football is expected. be pretty good too. Here’s what you need to know about the Sun Devils.

ASU offense

There are two names you might as well know by now: Jayden Daniels and Rachaad White. Daniels is entering his sophomore year of sophomore year as one of the PAC-12’s most touted quarterbacks, registering a passer rating over 145 every year he’s at ASU. Having said that, he’s more of the QB ‘one read and one take off’ type, but can the boy take off. He leads the ground team, averaging nearly 9 yards per carry on 19 attempts this year. He’s an efficient passer but won’t dazzle you with his arm. Last week against UNLV he was 2 for 6 on passes that traveled over 10 yards in the air with a touchdown and a pick.

His teammate Rachaad White offers a home run capability in a bulky 6’2,210lbs frame. He’s not particularly devious but can run away from defensive backs and has a nose for the end zone. He has four touchdowns in two weeks and gives Daniels a solid option off the backfield with a team leading six receptions. Sun Devil pass catchers are big and physical, presenting game problems all over the field. All but one catcher is over 6’1,200lbs and the tight ends are over 6’7. None have come up with flashy numbers yet this season, but WR Ricky Pearsoll has particularly proven to be an explosive option in the passing and running game.

USS Defense

Sun Devil’s defensive scheme bears a striking resemblance to what we see at BYU under Ilaisa Tuiaki. They like to rush at 4s and run mostly on the backend, but will bring some creative blitzes when the time is right. The Sun Devils’ top seven registered 5 sacks last week, including 2 from stud linebacker Darien Butler. Butler will be seen all over the field on Saturday. He leads the team in tackles, loss tackles, sacks, INTs and partridges in pear trees.

The Sun Devils also have two incredibly strong corners with Chase Lucas and Jack Jones, who can hang on to talented BYU receivers in head-to-head clashes. The defense has looked solid against admittedly weak opponents so far this season, but at times seems vulnerable against moving quarterbacks. UNLV QB Donald Brumfield who averaged over five yards per carry and one touchdown last week.

Prediction

A game that forces Daniels to throw from the pocket is a game that favors BYU but forcing him to throw is difficult to do. It’s not a patient passer who goes up in the pocket and makes a big throw when under duress. In fact, he’s run 89% of the time under pressure this season and only threw one pass from an unclean pocket. If BYU puts the pressure on, they’ll feel the full impact of Jayden Daniels’ running ability.

He’s faster than anyone on BYU’s Front 7 and we’ll likely see a myriad of games where Daniels or White appear to be bottled up in the backfield to squirt in the open field. Therefore, BYU will have to play assignment football on the 11 defensive positions to keep Daniels a secret. The easiest way, however, to force Daniels to pitch is a quick departure from the BYU offense forcing ASU to follow.

I would expect to see ASU performing a lot of drop-7 zone defending, which I think favors BYU. BYU will have plenty of middle lanes open in the middle, meaning tight ends Isaac Rex and Dallin Holker will have their moments to shine early after being mostly asked to pass protection over the past two weeks. BYU’s offensive line looked formidable last week, and I expect a similar performance on Saturday.

The race lanes will be there against a four-man race, leaving Tyler Allgeier a good three meters to gain the upper hand before meeting his first tackle. That’s the Tyler advantage. As linebackers are forced to cheat to stop the race, deeper roads will open up, and this will be the game where Hall connects to a Nacua in sequence.

Both teams will be able to score points. BYU looks poised for an offensive breakthrough and that will be the game it brings together. In addition, it will be the loudest crowd that ASU has played in front of since October 2019 and will likely be the loudest they face all season. Jaren Hall’s dynamic double-threat ability and the crowd at Lavell Edwards Stadium make the difference on Saturday as BYU gets just enough saves to secure the victory.

BYU 31 – 24 ASU


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Dylan Sampson, Dutchtown use Covington, 37-15 | Preparation sports

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GEISMAR – Covington did his best to keep up a powerful attack from Dutchtown for one half, but after spending a ton of time on the pitch he couldn’t sustain his defensive effort in the second half.

Host Griffins scored 20 points in the third quarter to open a close game, as they clinched the win, 37-15, at Griffin Stadium on September 17.

It was the fourth consecutive season that the teams played an out-of-district game against each other, and Dutchtown won all four.

“I think we did a good job of hanging on in the first half,” said Covington coach Greg Salter. “We had our chances to stay tied or take the lead, but not getting into the end zone when we got closer hurt us.

“And some special team losses have been very frustrating for me because I expect better. We have a lot of work to do, but I love this group. We are young, but we will continue to improve every week. .

Dutchtown led 7-0 at halftime on a 45-yard interception return for a Carter Hanberry touchdown on the last play of the first quarter. They came out quickly after halftime, as they opened the game with three third-quarter touchdowns from Tennessee clerk Dylan Sampson.

In total, the Griffins (2-0) racked up 371 rushing yards and Sampson had 186 in just 13 carries.

“We knew we were rising in the competition,” said Dutchtown coach Guy Mistretta. “We’ve been working hard on this in practice all week, but I don’t think the players have realized how physical they (Covington) are until they’re on the pitch with them.

“We struggled in the first half, but in the second half we really came out with a different mindset and we really won it up front.”

Justin Chapman led Covington with 118 rushing yards and one scoring.

SCORE PER QUARTER

Covington | 0 | 0 | 0 | 15 – 15

Dutchtown | 7 | 0 | 20 | 10 – 37

SUMMARY OF RATING

First shift

Dutchtown – Interception return Carter Hanberry 45 (Jacob Etter kick), 0:00, 0-7

Second quarter

No rating

Third quarter

Dutchtown – Dylan Sampson 38 run (missed kick), 8:36, 0-13

Dutchtown – Sampson 23 assist from Pierson Parent (Etter kick), 5:40, 0-20

Dutchtown – Sampson 33 run (Etter kick), 0:53, 0-27

Fourth trimester

Covington – Race Justin Chapman 63 (race Quintez Laurent) 11:48, 8-27

Dutchtown – Etter 23 FG, 3:35, 8-30

Dutchtown – Jaedon Brown 29 run (Etter kick), 1:55, 8-37

Covington – David Harris 59 run (Mason Estrada kick), 0:41, 15-37

STATISTICS

Covington, 252 total yards (203 rushing, 49 passing)

To rush : Justin Chatman, 11-118, TD; David Harris, 3-69, TD; Quintez Laurent, 6-5.

Reception: Laurent, 4-24, Chatman 2-16, Harris 1-9

Who passed: Brandon Coakley, 7-13, 49 yards, 0 touchdowns, 1 INT

Dutchtown, 419 total yards of attack (371 rushing, 48 passing)

To rush : Dylan Sampson, 13-186, 2 TDs; Baylor Langlois, 20-85, Gary Dukes, 4-47; Jaedon Brown 2-36, TD, Pierson Parent 5-5

Reception: Sampson, 2-29, 2 TDs; Langlois 1-14; Ickes 1-5

Who passed: Parent, 4-9, 48 yards, 1 TD, 1 INT

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Locksmith’s pick six for week 3

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There’s no shortage of quality games this weekend, from Alabama-Florida (Bryce Young’s first test drive) to Auburn-Penn State (Bo Nix’s last attempt at a major test drive) to the 50th anniversary of ” The Game of The Century, ”when former rivals Nebraska and Oklahoma go head-to-head (and how much could the Cornhuskers be using a Johnny Rodgers guy right now?).

Two games in particular provide additional intrigue. Cincinnati visits Indiana in a game that will help shape the winner’s season and the always pesky Fresno State visits the undefeated UCLA, which is still trying to prove itself.

So much for the intro. Let’s move on to games after a 5-1 ATS mark last week.

Florida State on WAKE FOREST, taking 5

Here’s the reflection: 2-0 Wake isn’t that good yet and 0-2 Florida State isn’t that bad. It’s not to wrap the Seminoles’ loss to Jacksonville State, but the reality is that they’ve now lost twice in the last game of the game (the other being against Notre Dame). Mike Norvell has at least one QB option at McKenzie Milton if Jordan Travis keeps his momentum going and RB Jashaun Corbin (253 rushing yards) averages 8.4 yards per carry. Wake beat ODU and Norfolk State – two teams that didn’t even play last year. This is a huge step forward for a suspicious offense.

Cincinnati to INDIANA, giving 4

Until the Bearcats are officially in the Big 12, all of those games against the Power 5 teams are a referendum for their playoff prospects. Cincy is nowhere near playing his best – a bright spot so early on – and quarterback Desmond Ridder knows how to lead this team to victory. He did it in a lot of big spots. Offensive balance and physical defense remain Cincy’s hallmarks. I don’t know what to do with the Hoosiers yet. They suffered a bad loss to a good team from Iowa and beat Murray State hands down, but QB Michael Penix Jr. still seems to be recovering from his injury. The offense was uneven at this point.

Nebraska on OKLAHOMA, taking 22

I’m not predicting an upheaval here, but isn’t it time Scott Frost’s side showed they can be competitive in a big spot? A bad loss to Illinois started the year and wins against Fordham and Buffalo followed, with one bright spot throughout: Veteran QB Adrian Martinez is finally playing the best football of his career, still without any interceptions and 256 rushing yards leading the team. The earlier ones have a lot of firepower, but is anyone convinced their defense is playoff-caliber after giving Tulane 35 points? Spencer Rattler, for all his hype on Heisman, already has two INTs. Thinking that Cornhuskers can be competitive here. Otherwise, already shoot Frost.

PENN STATE on Auburn, giving 6

We’ve seen quarterback Sean Clifford take center stage in the Nittany Lions’ 16-10 win at Wisconsin before. Perhaps he has finally developed the consistency that has eluded him so far. That Penn State defense looks to be good and James Franklin’s side now know the Big Ten East and a playoff berth is up for grabs with Ohio State showing their vulnerability. The Tigers have beaten Akron and Alabama State and no one ever knows which Bo Nix will show up for QB. Too often it has been prone to mistakes. It’s a huge test in a tough environment – against a quality defense. This is not the recipe for success for Auburn.

Virginia Tech on WEST VIRGINIA, taking 3

Still skeptical of QB Braxton Burmeister’s ability to raise the Hokies, but he played well and Tech already has a quality win in beating North Carolina. It’s a defense that has already registered nine sacks with four interceptions in two games. The Mountaineers, losers in the opener against Maryland (allowing the Terps 499 yards), had a scrimmage in the last game against LIU that was to no avail. QB Jarrett Doege can be pushed to make mistakes, which Tech needs to capitalize on.

Fresno State on UCLA, taking 11 1/2

They’ve been on the Bruins’ bandwagon from the start, but after a pair of peak performances this game oozes disappointment – and the Bulldogs are more than capable of upsetting. The UCLA running back tandem of Brittain Brown and Zac Charbonnet have been outstanding so far, and Chip Kelly will no doubt be riding those two here. Fresno isn’t a team that will curl up in the Rose Bowl, having previously forced Oregon to a 31-24 victory. QB Jake Haener has eight touchdowns, no interceptions and rushed for three scores. It’s a huge game for Fresno; it really looks like a deception game for UCLA.

LAST WEEK VS. SPREAD: 5-1

SEASON TO DATE VS. SPREADING: 9-3

CAPS reception team


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Bruins put an unbeaten start to the test against Henderson | Sports

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Football Central Hardin passed its final test last week in a road victory over John Hardin. Now the 4-0 Bruins are back home to face Henderson County tonight.

Central Hardin, seventh in the standings, will lose a few players when the colonels travel to Cecilia.

“We’re screwed right now. Of course, we lost Trey Williams last week to a knee injury for the season. Then on Friday against John, we lost Brock Burton, one of our starting defensive tackles. He will be absent for 2 to 4 weeks with an MCL sprain in his knee. … Nolan Goodman, he was injured on Friday with a hamstring injury, ”Central Hardin coach Tim Mattingly said. “It’s that time of year, especially after playing a physical game like we did against John, you have bumps, bruises, sprains and strains so it will be a test for us.”

The Bruins showed Mattingly a little more of what they’re capable of last week in their win from behind.

In defense, Central Hardin kept running back John Hardin Keyandre Strand, the state’s top rusher, within 100 yards for the first time this season. The offense also continued to show, with players like quarterback Zakery Spurrier going from no rushed touchdowns entering the game to three at the end of the game.

“They really showed a very, very nice determination and courage to come back from a 7-0 loss to a good football team with John Hardin. There was good leadership from our seniors and starters who really pulled themselves together and had the determination to get this win, ”said Mattingly. “I was just proud of their tenacity and I feel like our conditioning again in the fourth quarter really paid off. I feel like we got stronger as the game progressed into the fourth quarter. “

No.9-ranked Henderson County enter the game with a 2-1 record, having won their opener against Calloway County on August 20 and then being credited with another victory due a COVID cancellation for its game against Christian County on September 3. Most recently, the Colonels lost 48-14 to reigning Class 4A state champion Boyle County last week.

Even with a recent loss, Mattingly said that’s no reason to overlook this Henderson County team, especially with some of the Bruins’ injuries.

Some of the Henderson County players who caught Mattingly’s attention include defensive lineman Saadiq Clement, running back Jaheim Williams and quarterback Dru Meadows.

“Henderson County has a very good football team. They lost to Boyle County on Friday, but Boyle County is one of those elite teams that a lot of people lose to, so you can’t really watch this game too much. You must be able to control their racing game. They steer the ball with great efficiency, ”he said.

“(Clement) is a man. He’s explosive. It’s going to cause problems. He’s playing on both sides of the ball… (Williams) has explosive speed. We played against him last year and he really burned us in the second half with long runs…. (Meadows) is more of a double threat and can run the ball really well and is really, really, really explosive with his run too. We have a lot of work to do to get screwed and play a good quality opponent in Henderson County. It will certainly be a test.

Central Hardin and Henderson County start at 8 p.m.


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Bus driver shortage: Toms River forced to postpone sports matches

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TOMS RIVER, NJ – The Toms River Regional School Board approved the hiring of five bus drivers for the 2021-22 school year on Wednesday evening.

He also accepted the retirement of one driver and the resignation of two others.

It has been so for months, said William Doering, district affairs administrator, and Laurel Venberg, district transportation manager.

“It’s like we win one and lose two,” said Venberg, who was promoted to manager in July following the retirement of Margaret Donnelly, longtime district transportation manager. “We asked someone to submit their papers the other day.”

The district currently lacks 50 bus drivers, Venberg said. They have 32 contract positions that are unfilled, and she needs 20 more drivers on the replacement list, ready to replace drivers taking paid vacation, who are on medical leave or, now, those who need to be put on. quarantine due to COVID-19 exposure.

All retirements and resignations have had a domino effect, and the most recent domino to fall is extracurricular sports. The lack of available buses is forcing the district to reschedule games, mainly at the junior and freshman levels, district officials said.

“We don’t have buses available until 4 pm,” said Ted Gillen, athletic coordinator for Toms River regional schools. This means away games start later, with the potential to run out of daylight. Some districts have let students leave class earlier to adjust to sports, Gillen said, and others have rescheduled games as well.

The district has tried to hire private bus companies to meet some of the needs, but private companies, which also face a shortage of drivers, have refused to bid on bus rides, the acting superintendent said. Stephen Genco.

Schools in Toms River have tried to find alternative solutions, including asking parents to drive their children to games, but this only helps where parents are available to do so. However, having the students drive themselves is not an option.

“We can’t let 17-year-olds drive on the promenade,” Genco said.

The shortage of school bus drivers is affecting districts in New Jersey and across the country. In Glassboro, the school district changed layoff times at two of its schools after it was cut short due to the resignation of eight drivers just before the start of the school year. Woodbridge and Edison School Districts have cut routes, meaning there are more children on each bus, extending commute times and reducing social distancing.

The shortage is so acute in Massachusetts that the National Guard has been activated to help drive school buses, and in Philadelphia, the school district is offering parents $ 300 a month to drive their children to school.

In the 2019-20 school year, the Toms River bus lines had drivers assigned to bus trips to high school and then as shuttles, Venberg said. “We had 30 buses that would help with sports,” she said.

The shortage of drivers in Toms River has led the district to adjust the start times of five schools, consolidate bus routes and align them to maximize efficiency. This means that each driver has bus routes throughout the day and there are no drivers for the shuttles or for the sports until the last primary school trips are completed. She has a replacement driver.

“I have two office staff who drive buses,” due to drivers who are in COVID-19 quarantine, Venberg said.

Toms River currently has 24 people who have applied to drive for the school district, including three who have commercial driver’s licenses but do not have state approvals to drive passengers and school buses, Venberg said.

Trying to get them through the state clearance process has been a challenge, she said. The fingerprinting process alone takes three weeks, and getting responses from the MVC to emails takes up to a week, as these employees still work from home part of the week, Venberg said.

Another part of the problem is getting a commercial driver’s license and approving school buses has become more difficult over the years, Venberg said.

“Previously, they only had a school bus driver’s license,” said Venberg, who drove for a private bus company for a dozen years before joining the Toms River school district there. 17 years.

The requirement for a CDL, which is a federal license, means that school bus drivers must know all parts of the engine.

“A school bus driver doesn’t need to know how to fix an engine,” Venberg said. “That’s why we have bus mechanics.”

“We threw so many obstacles in our way,” said Evie Wills, administrator of the New Jersey School Bus Contractors Association, an organization of private school bus companies.

Laws passed in the wake of the fatal Route 80 school bus crash in 2018 that killed an elementary school student and teacher drove people into their bus keys, she said. Among the new rules is the requirement that school bus drivers aged 75 or over undergo a medical examination certified by the Federal Ministry of Transport every three months, to prove that they are fit to drive.

“Transportation managers have told me they are losing their best drivers,” because of this rule, Wills said.

To be certified to drive a school bus, you must have a valid New Jersey driver’s license, be at least 21 years old, and have had a clean driving record for at least three years. You must pass a U.S. Department of Transportation physical exam – which must be performed by a certified doctor to perform these physical exams – and a drug test, criminal background check, and your fingerprints.

After that there is a written exam and a road test to obtain the license with the endorsements for passengers and school buses. It’s a complex process, Wills and Venberg said.

William Connolly, spokesperson for the New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission, said the state has taken steps to make the CDL process more efficient for those looking to drive school buses.

“Most school bus driver candidates are now tested through a streamlined planning process coordinated with the school bus industry and school districts, allowing CDL candidates to complete multiple steps in a single visit,” he said. he declared.

“We are in regular contact with school districts and commercial driving schools. When either identifies a candidate school bus driver, we offer testing and accreditation through this fast-track bulk process. Our goal is to move all school bus drivers to a priority schedule and out of our regular scheduling platform. “

The aim is to get “tested and properly accredited drivers behind the wheel of school buses as quickly and safely as possible,” he said.

Wills said what the state has done is allow people who wish to become school bus drivers to make an appointment with the MVC to have their documents approved, take the written exam and schedule their road test. in one trip – instead of having made three separate trips to accomplish these tasks. And once the potential driver has made an online appointment, private companies can contact the state to move that appointment forward.

She said the accommodations came after private bus companies contacted the state and warned them of the crisis the state is now facing with the shortage of drivers.

Although Connolly said the state VMC made this available to school districts as well, it was not clear if or to what extent this had been communicated to districts. Venberg said applicants to Toms River schools must book their appointments online, but did not mention any part of the process, including fast-track driving tests.

Venberg said not all people who apply to become a school bus driver are suitable for the job. There was one candidate who was released during training due to continued delays on bus trips – the result of stopping to chat with people, she said.

“If the driver was late during the training process, what if no one was there to watch him? ” she said.

For some, however, bureaucracy is the only obstacle keeping them away from the driver’s seat.

Steve Padula of Berkeley Township has been approved as a Toms River Schools Bus Driver. Padula holds a commercial driver’s license and has spent over 40 years driving trucks. He wants to get away from the toll that long distance trucking takes with long days on the road away from home.

“I have my physique, I took my fingerprints,” he said. The only thing holding him back? The written test for the school bus rider.

“I missed one question too many,” he said. He tried to schedule a new test, and the documentation gives a deadline for doing so, but trying to get an appointment in the Toms River MVC office was frustrating.

“The first one available was in mid-November,” said Padula. The only other options were to drive more than an hour to take the test. “It’s ridiculous because all the other computers in Toms River are sitting there wide open.”

“I have nothing on my license,” said Padula. “No DOT violation. No motor vehicle violation.”

“There has to be a better way,” he said.

As Venberg continues to try to find drivers and guide them through the licensing process, Gillen must continue to try to find solutions for transporting athletes. He acknowledged a parent’s complaint about communicating about the issues at Wednesday’s school board meeting and vowed to improve communication.

The solutions are not easy to find. Gillen said the possibilities are being discussed, but few are immediate answers to an issue that will only get worse as all sports hit the full season. Fall is the busiest, with football, men’s and women’s soccer, field hockey, women’s volleyball, cross country, women’s tennis and gymnastics.

But finding solutions will become more critical as the winter season approaches, with the potential for reckless driving.

Gillen hopes the district will be able to have more drivers in the bus seats by then, to give the district more options.

“We are always looking for creative solutions,” said Gillen. “When you don’t have people who can drive (the buses), how can you be creative? “

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Carlton Madden Jr. signs up for football in Georgia

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The Bulldogs made another entry for the class of 2022. Outside linebacker Carlton Madden Jr. has pledged his services to the Bulldogs, bringing the total number of entries in the cycle to seventeen.

Madden attends Cedar Grove High School in Ellenwood, Ga., Where he’s notably teamed up with defensive tackle Christen Miller, another prime target for Georgia in the 2022 class.

Georgia gifted Madden after seeing him during her unofficial visit in June. The staff were very impressed with his measurables and offered to him shortly after his visit.

He had originally entered Colorado before the start of the summer. However, after he started attending camps due to the lifting of the dead period, Madden began to gain the attention of high profile programs.

After impressing in his training the first time on campus, Georgia brought him back for a second visit. This time, be sure to make Madden a priority the second time around. Madden would eventually meet with defensive coordinator and outside linebackers coach Dan Lanning, suggesting his physical attributes suggest he could become an impact starter for the Bulldogs on the road as outside support.

He is 6 feet tall and weighs 238 pounds. while performing a 40 yard dash in 4.88 seconds. Madden also has a 32 inch vertical jump, adding to an already impressive athletic profile.

Georgia staff believe in Madden for the long haul. Sadly, the Ranking Services don’t have him as a major rookie, but that shouldn’t make you any less excited about this commitment and is likely to change before things get done this season. Madden has the potential to be considered an absolute steal for Georgia in a few years.

You may also like:

Injury report as week three approaches

Georgia Bulldogs Week Two Progress Report: Violation

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National Sports Convention moves to online event

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The National Sports Convention has announced that its 2021 event scheduled for November 9-11 will transition to a five-tier virtual conference and networking event that has been realigned to meet current COVID challenges and industry needs.

The online event will offer a mix of weekly conference programs and will aim to host an in-person networking and awards event as part of the National Sports Convention (NSC) prayer in early December.

The expanded NSC conference program now offers:

  • Global sessions and weekly keynote every Thursday morning (90 minutes)
  • Eight hours of on-demand workshops against each of the five components
  • NSC Oration, Awards and Networking event scheduled for Thursday, December 9
  • Access to over 75 hours of NSC Academy video interviews, presentations and ideas
  • More than 20 hours of interviews with supplier solutions aligned with each of the conference flows

NSC Co-Founder Martin Sheppard commented “We have worked with our collaborators, speakers and sponsors to provide the industry with an expanded program with significant increased value, which has been difficult, but exciting at the same time.

“The NSC has become the premier conference for the sports and community recreation industry in Australia and we hope to continue to share global best practices with policy advocacy and case studies in Australia and New Zealand.

“By adopting new platforms, NSC21 can achieve this in a way expected by the industry. We aim every Thursday morning (9:00 am-10:30am) to host an opening discussion with key opinion leaders, which will be interactive for industry participation. Each Thursday, we will also be posting eight hours of on-demand streaming workshops to allow flexible viewing.

The five main conferences and sessions will now include:

Thursday November 11
A bold program for sports management

  • Main Session (9:00 am – 10:30 am): A New Global Agenda – Innovation, Growth and Future Investment – The principles of sustainability provide opportunities for innovation, encourage future growth and investments for success.
  • Seven on-demand workshops broadcast at 10:30 am

Thursday November 18
Growing participation in active cities

  • Main session (9:00 am – 10:30 am): Active communities, active cities – A more active nation – Encouraging more people to be more physically active, active communities and active city policies and strategies, for a more active nation.
  • Six on-demand workshops broadcast at 10:30 am

Thursday 25 November
Create impactful community sports and recreation facilities

  • Main session (9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.): Creation of community recreation and sport facilities with an impact on the health and well-being of the community
  • Six on-demand workshops broadcast at 10:30 am

Thursday 2 December
Sustainability in the design of sports fields and facilities

  • Main session (9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.): The importance of climate change for sport and the impact of sport on climate change
  • Six on-demand workshops broadcast at 10:30 am

Thursday December 9
NSC prayer, awards ceremony and networking

  • NSC Oratory and Panel Session (4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.): A Plan for the Next Decade – Brisbane 2032 and beyond
  • Presentation of the Australian Sport, Recreation and Play Innovation Awards;
  • Launch of NSC 2022; and
  • In-person industry networking event.

The National Sports Convention recently became the National Sports and Physical Activity Convention.
The full program can be viewed on www.nationalsportsconvention.com.au

Related Articles

June 11, 2021 – The 2021 National Sports Convention will present a “daring and sustainable agenda”

November 10, 2020 – First National Sports Convention Forum organized in Sydney

October 15, 2020 – National Sports Convention postpones Brisbane event while adopting COVID rules Melbourne and Sydney Forums

August 31, 2020 – National Sports Convention events to address the future of aquatic, recreational and sports facilities

July 23, 2020 – The National Sports Convention pivots to offer several forums in November

December 9, 2019 – The 2020 National Sports Convention seeks to provide a framework to activate more Australians

July 25, 2019 – National Sports Convention hears about measures taken to meet physical activity guidelines for young people

July 24, 2019 – World Health Organization promotes action plan for physical activity at National Sport Convention

July 16, 2019 – National Sports Convention co-founder identifies Expo “game changers”

April 17, 2019 – National Sports Convention program explores encouraging children and young people to be more active

April 8, 2019 – Launch of the 2019 National Sports Convention program on the theme Reimagining Sport

July 11, 2018 – The Sports Commission is proud to be associated with the National Sports Convention

July 5, 2018 – National Sports Convention to link business, education and networking opportunities


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Virtual physical education during COVID-19: exploring future directions for equitable e-learning tools

This article was originally published here

Life Before Sports Act. Aug 26, 2021; 3: 716566. doi: 10.3389 / fspor.2021.716566. Electronic collection 2021.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: School closures caused by the COVID-19 pandemic have reduced opportunities for young Americans to be physically active and have had a disproportionate impact on health disparities in this population. Physical education provides the greatest intervention to support the physical activity of school-aged youth, but the views of teachers on how to maintain quality programs during periods of virtual learning remain unexplored. Applying a diversity, equity and inclusion framework, this study explored the perceived importance by physical education teachers of different design features of an online teaching tool to promote equity. in terms of physical activity during school closings. Methods : Previous publications and focus groups guided the development of a survey administered in the summer / fall of 2020. Survey participants (m = 60) were physical education teachers from 400 U.S. preschools randomly selected from a national database. Participants rated the importance of four design characteristics versus five key attributes of an online supplement to in-person physical education programs. One-way ANOVAs were used to assess differences in teacher scores by demographic characteristics. Results: Differences between groups were found in teachers’ ratings of design features related to usability, accessibility, fairness, and formal assessment capabilities of an online physical education tool. The differences were based on the gender of the teachers, the level of the school and the geographic location. Conclusion: Future research to promote equity in physical activity among preschool to grade 12 youth should examine personalized physical education virtual learning tools that address what teachers consider to be the most common design features. most important in supporting equitable physical education among diverse groups of students.

PMID: 34514390 | PMC: PMC8426569 | DOI: 10.3389 / fspor.2021.716566


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Virtual physical education during COVID-19: exploring future directions for equitable e-learning tools

This article was originally published here

Life Before Sports Act. August 26, 2021; 3: 716566. doi: 10.3389 / fspor.2021.716566. Electronic collection 2021.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: School closures caused by the COVID-19 pandemic have reduced opportunities for young Americans to be physically active and have had a disproportionate impact on health disparities in this population. Physical education provides the greatest intervention to support the physical activity of school-aged youth, but the views of teachers on how to maintain quality programs during periods of virtual learning remain unexplored. Applying a diversity, equity and inclusion framework, this study explored the perceived importance by physical education teachers of different design features of an online teaching tool to promote equity. in terms of physical activity during school closings. Methods : Previous publications and focus groups guided the development of a survey administered in the summer / fall of 2020. Survey participants (m = 60) were physical education teachers from 400 US preschools randomly selected from a national database. Participants rated the importance of four design characteristics versus five key attributes of an online supplement to in-person physical education programs. One-way ANOVAs were used to assess differences in teacher scores by demographic characteristics. Results: Differences between groups were found in teachers’ ratings of design features related to usability, accessibility, fairness, and formal assessment capabilities of an online physical education tool. The differences were based on the gender of the teachers, the level of the school and the geographic location. Conclusion: Future research to promote equity in physical activity among preschool to grade 12 youth should examine personalized physical education virtual learning tools that address what teachers see as the most common design features. more important in supporting equitable physical education among diverse groups of students.

PMID: 34514390 | PMC: PMC8426569 | DOI: 10.3389 / fspor.2021.716566


Source link

Virtual physical education during COVID-19: exploring future directions for equitable e-learning tools

This article was originally published here

Life Before Sports Act. August 26, 2021; 3: 716566. doi: 10.3389 / fspor.2021.716566. Electronic collection 2021.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: School closures caused by the COVID-19 pandemic have reduced the opportunities for young Americans to be physically active and have had a disproportionate impact on health disparities in this population. Physical education provides the greatest intervention to support the physical activity of school-aged youth, but the views of teachers on how to maintain quality programs during periods of virtual learning remain unexplored. Applying a diversity, equity and inclusion framework, this study explored the perceived importance by physical education teachers of different design features of an online teaching tool to promote equity. in terms of physical activity during school closings. Methods : Previous publications and focus groups guided the development of a survey administered in the summer / fall of 2020. Survey participants (m = 60) were physical education teachers from 400 U.S. preschools randomly selected from a national database. Participants rated the importance of four design characteristics versus five key attributes of an online supplement to in-person physical education programs. One-way ANOVAs were used to assess differences in teacher scores by demographic characteristics. Results: Differences between groups were found in teachers’ ratings of design features related to usability, accessibility, fairness, and formal assessment capabilities of an online physical education tool. The differences were based on the gender of the teachers, the level of the school and the geographic location. Conclusion: Future research to promote equity in physical activity among preschool to grade 12 youth should examine personalized physical education virtual learning tools that address what teachers consider to be the most common design features. most important in supporting equitable physical education among diverse groups of students.

PMID: 34514390 | PMC: PMC8426569 | DOI: 10.3389 / fspor.2021.716566


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